Drones In Tanzania – For Now, A Big ‘No-No’

Most people love to take photos on their holidays and a safari in Tanzania provides excellent photo-opportunities beyond your wildest imagination. Every safari is different, so we cannot tell you what you might capture with your camera or mobile phone, but leaving Tanzania without pictures would be unforgivable, that’s for sure! After all, how often in your life will you see a pride of lions basking in the sun, a herd of elephants on the march, or a pod of giant hippos wallowing in their murky pool?

But we must give a word of warning, as the use of drones for any purpose is strictly prohibited in all of Tanzania’s National Parks and visitors are advised not to bring drones of any other unmanned aerial vehicle into Tanzania. This prohibition is imposed by our Government for security purposes, and – in a dangerous world – we must all comply with this rule, without exception.

But here’s the good news! Our Easy Travel driver-guides are the best in the business, 100% dedicated to getting you the very best photo opportunities out in the wild. You only need to read a few reviews on Tripadvisor to see what our visitors say about the guides’ incredible ability to spot the wonderful wildlife of Tanzania and get in the best positions for you to take breath-taking, jaw-dropping pictures that will ‘wow’ your friends when you get home…and give you a permanent, photographic bank of memories to stay with you forever.

The combination of your camera or phone and our Easy Travel driver-guides will ensure that, even without drones, you can capture our natural wonders in fantastic pictures. And don’t forget, if you need a ‘view from above’ of our National Parks and their fascinating inhabitants, we offer you the option to book a hot air balloon safari. If you decide to take one of those…don’t forget your camera!


Tanzania Visa Application FAQs

Your safari has been planned, the excitement is building; Tanzania’s wildlife, people and incredible scenery are awaiting your arrival. Now, it’s time to make sure that your paperwork is in order. Yes, we know it’s boring, but it is essential to get everything right so that your arrival in beautiful Tanzania is as smooth as possible. It’s so important – please read on!

Easy Travel and Tours are providing the information below to assist visitors in applying for their visas. We are always here to help! Nevertheless, we must stress that each visitor must apply for their visa well in advance of their proposed visit, comply with the correct procedures in their application and be in possession of a valid, appropriate visa when they arrive. The official website for applications is www.immigration.go.tz, which also provides contact numbers if applicants require further information or have any queries.

It is very important to take a note that the only official website to apply for Tanzania online visa is www.immigration.go.tz. The Tanzanian immigration does not recognize nor accept any other website or agent that claim to be Tanzania Visa application centre.

Q. Do I need a visa?

A. The short answer is yes, unless you hold a passport from one of the countries listed below. If your country is in this list, then the good news is that you are exempt from the requirement for a visa. If your country is not on this list, you must get a visa. As the list is updated frequently, please check immediately before applying.

Exempt countries:

Antigua & Barbuda
Anguilla
Ashmore & Certie Island
Bahamas
Barbados
Bermuda
Belize
Brunei
British Virgin Island
British Indian Ocean Territory
Botswana
Cyprus
Cayman Island
Channel Island
Cocoas Island
Cook Island
Christmas Island
Dominica
Falkland Island
Gambia
Ghana
Gibraltar
Grenada
Guernsey
Guyana
Heard Island
Hong Kong
Isle of Man
Jamaica
Jersey
Kenya
Kiribati
Lesotho
Malawi
Montserrat
Malaysia
Madagascar
Malta
Mauritius
Macao
Mozambique
Nauru
Naue Island
Norfolk Island
Namibia
Papua new Guinea
Rwanda
Romania
Ross Dependency
Samoa
Seychelles
Singapore
Solomon Island
South Sudan
Swaziland
St. Kitts&Navis
St. Lucia
St. Vicent
St. Helana
South African Republic
Trinidad & Tobago
Turks & Caicos
Tokelan
Tonga
Tuvalu
Vanuatu
Uganda
Zambia
Zimbabwe

Q. Once I get my visa, am I guaranteed entry to Tanzania?

A. As with most countries in the world, the possession of a valid Visa for the United Republic of Tanzania does not provide automatic right of entry into the country. The Immigration Officer at the port of entry may refuse entry to any person, if he is satisfied that such a person is unable to fulfil the immigration requirements or that such person’s presence in the United Republic of Tanzania would be contrary to national interests or security.

Q. Is it still possible to obtain a visa on arrival?

A. Yes, it is still possible to obtain a visa on arrival at entry points. The Tanzanian Government has not yet fully phased out visas on arrival, but the government will phase out visas on arrival at some point which is not yet known.
We recommend visitors to apply visas online in advance to avoid unnecessary ques at the entry points and to allow visitors to check out faster.

Q. Which visa should I apply for?

A. Nearly all those booking safaris or mountain climbs with us will need to apply for an ‘Ordinary’ single-entry visa. However, if you are intending to make multiple entries into the country, or are travelling for any purpose other than tourism, or are intending to stay in Tanzania for more than 90 days you should read the guidelines on the website carefully to ensure that you apply for the correct type of visa. All US citizens, please see ‘How much does a visa cost?’ below

Q. How do I pay for my visa?

A. During the online application process, you may pay for your visa by use of a credit card (Visa or Mastercard.) We at Easy Travel do not advise paying for your Visa by the ‘SWIFT transfer’ option offered on the Government website, as it can be difficult to trace payment and this may delay the granting of the visa and prevent your entry to Tanzania.

Q. How much does a visa cost?

A. Currently, a single-entry ordinary (tourist) visa costs $50 USD and a multiple-entry visa costs $100 USD. Note that US Citizens must apply for the multiple-entry visa, and pay $100 USD, even if they are only making a single trip. Prices for any other types of visa are detailed on the website.

Q. How do I know if my visa has been approved?

A. You will be notified by e-mail. Before receiving approval, you will be able to check the status of your application online.

Q. How long does my visa last for?

A. An ordinary single-entry visa will last for 90 days.

Q. Apart from being required to make a payment, what other documents do I need?

A. You will need to be able to upload a passport-size photo of yourself, the biographic data page of your passport, and a copy of your return flight ticket. Passport size photograph usually has dimensions of 4.5mm X 3.5mm.Your passport-size photo and biographic data page of the passport needs to be saved in Jpg/png formats separately with maximum size of 300kb each, see below picture for better understanding.

Please note that your passport must have validity for at least six months after the date of your departure from Tanzania, and also have at least one full unused/unstamped visa page.

Q. My visa application has been rejected. How do I get my fee refunded?

A. Unfortunately, fees paid for a visa application cannot be refunded.

Q. When should I apply for my visa?

A. Although the government website indicated that a visa application takes 10 days to process, we advise that you should apply for your visa as soon as you are able and certainly not less than 30 days before your departure for Tanzania.

Q. I am from a country which is listed below in the category of ‘Referred Visa.’ When should I apply for my visa?

A. We advise any visitors in this category to apply for their visas at least 90 days before their proposed arrival in Tanzania and to obtain visa approval before booking any flights or incurring other costs (such as non-refundable hotel bookings). Visitors from these countries will need to have a referral letter from Easy Travel: we can write this once we have received the deposit for their booking. Countries in this category are listed below, but as the list is updated frequently, please check immediately before applying.

Q. Referred Visa Countries:

Afghanistan
Azerbaijan
Bangladesh
Chad
Djibouti
Ethiopia
Eritrea
Equatorial Guinea
Iran
Iraq
Kazakhstan Republic
Kyigten Republic
Lebanon
Mali
Mauritania
Niger
Nigeria
Pakistan
Palestine
Senegal
Somalia
Sri Lanka
Somali land
Sierra Leone
Syria
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Yemen and
Stateless persons or persons with refugee status.

Q. I have found several websites offering visas to Tanzania. Can I apply through any of these sites?

A. No, we strongly advise you to use only the official government website, www.immigration.go.tz. Other rogue sites may cost more and will not be able to fast-track applications; they may also be ‘scam’ sites, taking your money without actually providing a visa.

Q. I have received confirmation of the grant of my visa. Do I still need a yellow fever certificate?

A. Yes – if you are arriving from, or transiting through, certain countries. The grant of a visa is entirely separate from any requirements with respect to yellow fever. Please see www.moh.go.tz and ensure that you comply with the requirements. Entry to Tanzania may be denied if you do not comply with these, even if you possess a valid visa.

Q. Which entry points can I use to enter Tanzania?

A. Applicants who have a visa can enter Tanzania through any of the following five entry points:
• Julius Nyerere International Airport (JNIA)
• Kilimanjaro International Airport (KIA)
• Abeid Amani Karume International Airport (AAKIA)
• Namanga border
• Tunduma border


Tanzania Bans Single-use Plastic Bags

Important: your action is required!

Here’s your chance to help!”

We all care about the environment, about nature, about the wonderful wildlife that Tanzania has to offer. We all share the responsibility of preserving what we have…otherwise, it may disappear forever.

In an important development, Tanzania has joined nearly 60 other countries in banning single-use plastic bags, and visitors to our beautiful country will have to take a share of the responsibility to keep it beautiful.

You can no longer bring any single-use plastic bags into Tanzania, nor use them when you are here!

Your responsibility as a visitor will start from the moment you arrive at the airport, or other entry point (for example, if arriving by land from a neighbouring country). You are allowed to bring in the see-through, zip-lock bags which you use to carry your liquids and toiletries through airport security, but you are expected to keep hold of these and not to dispose of them while in Tanzania. No other plastic bags should be brought into the country in either your hand luggage or your checked-in luggage. Failing to comply could result in delays when you arrive.

End Of Plastic Bags In Tanzania

A small exception to the ban has been made for certain milk and sugar bags authorised for use by Tanzanian retailers and additionally, any plastic or plastic packaging for medical services, industrial products, the construction industry, the agricultural sector, foodstuff, sanitary and waste management are not prohibited.

Replacements will be in the form of environmentally-friendly, biodegradable bags and these will shortly be available in Tanzania. Visitors arriving with any other plastic bags will have to surrender them on arrival and will be provided with alternatives.

Bag Usage In Tanzania - Zanzibar

The new regulations take effect from 1st June 2019, and just being a tourist or a visitor in any other capacity will not be acceptable as an excuse for carrying or using plastic bags.

Please observe these new rules and ensure that all members of your group are aware of them, too. Together, we can work to tackle the huge problem across the world, namely the dreadful pollution caused by non-biodegradable waste – especially plastic bags.

Currently, less than 10% of the world’s production is recycled. One thing’s for sure: the use of plastic is both an environmental catastrophe and a horrible eyesore – especially when set against the natural beauty of the Tanzanian landscape.

Help Tanzania to remain beautiful – so do not bring any single-use plastic bags into the country!


Why Elephant Trunks Have 40,000 Muscles (And Other Amazing Facts for World Elephant Day)

Young Elephant In The Serengeti

From a distance, you’re the first to spot a string of dots moving slowly along the Serengeti horizon. From the comfort of your safari vehicle these animals appear small, almost like ants, as they march single-file.

“Let’s go get a closer look,” says your guide. Yes, you think. Yes, please.

The speed picks up. Dust spirals behind your vehicle. Each member of your small group holds onto their hats as the Land Cruiser draws near, closer, so close now that those horizon dots grow feet and legs, big legs, legs the size of trees. And above those legs flap huge ears, wailing trunks, and leather skin.

Closer you drive until you’re twenty feet from these beasts, animals about as far from ants as you could ever imagine. You’ve spotted a herd of thirty African bush elephants. The herd is spread out, and your guide explains they are all headed towards the river for a drink.

“They can drink up to fifty gallons a day,” your guide explains. “About the amount of a typical bathtub!”

This flotilla of land mammals — the largest on the planet — slides steadily along the savannah, and you drive along next to them for the next hour, speechless, in awe. Sure, this landscape is vast, but this elephant sighting just made it larger-than-life.

Herd Of Elephants Spotted On A Safari In Tanzania

Introducing the African Bush Elephant

A safari just isn’t complete without an intimate encounter with an African bush elephant. These Cadillacs of the Serengeti are just too iconic, and too powerful to avoid.

As one of the “Big 5“, you will most certainly encounter your fair share of elephants in Tanzania, so why not arrive with a few important elephant facts?

  • Species Name: Loxidonta africana. There are three recognized species of elephants — the African Bush, African Forest, and Asian. You will likely only see the African bush elephants on safari.
  • Average lifespan: 60-70 years. Elephants have no natural predators, other than humans. Some experts say that teeth health actually determine an elephants lifespan! (Source)
  • Size: 8-12 feet. Some adults can reach up to 24 feet in length, too!
  • Range: African bush elephants are located only in Central and South Africa.
  • Estimated Population: Roughly 415,000 African elephants. Before the 20th century there were an estimated 3-5 million.

A Lone Elephant Walking Through The Serengeti

Elephants by the Numbers: Five Need-to-Know Statistics about the African Bush Elephant.

24,000 Pounds. This is the weight of the largest known elephant ever recorded (11,000 kg), discovered in Angola. The average adult elephant you will see on an Easy Travel safari will be around 13,000 pounds (5,900 kg) for males and 6,600 pounds (3,000 kg) for females.

300 Pounds. Large bodies mean large appetites, and the African bush elephant is constantly having to shove grasses, roots, and bark into its mouth to fend off hunger. These guys are known to eat upwards of 300-350 pounds of food per day!

40,000 Muscles. Each trunk of an average elephant carries 40,000 muscles in their trunk. Crazy, right? Unlike popular belief, these trunks are not used for drinking but, rather, to flip water into their mouths, almost like a spoon. Here are some other amazing things for which elephants use their trunks.

50 Years. Adult elephants will mate up until they are aged 50, and females will typically give birth every 5 years. Sometimes the births can take days, and baby elephants, as you might have guessed, are large upon arrival. Can you imagine giving birth to a baby that weighs 300 pounds? (Source)

8/12. Mark your calendars, because August 12 is World Elephant Day, a day dedicated to “bring attention to the urgent plight of the Asian and African elephants” worldwide. Started in 2011, this day is now officially recognized by over 65 wildlife organizations, many countries, and popular celebrities. Easy Travel supports World Elephant Day, along with many social and environmental initiatives. Learn more and follow their important work here.

Two Young Elephants Playing With Their Trunks On Safari In Tanzania

 

Top 3 Easy Travel Destinations to Spot Elephants? Tarangire National Park, the Serengeti, and Ngorongoro Crater

Bottom Line?

We love elephants. So much. To be fair, there are dozens more fascinating elephant behaviors to learn about — Herds are led by a matriarch! Elephants grieve and weep, and feel joy! — but know this: any Easy Travel tour will guarantee you a close-up experience with these incredible African bush elephants, found nowhere else on Earth. Our experienced guides have decades of experience and can share loads of elephant information with you, too.

 


Getting You There?

Contact us today and let’s get you started on designing an experience of a lifetime. Our Easy Travel staff can customize trips for you to elephant-dense corners of Tanzania.

Additional Resources:

 

Five Chimpanzee Facts That Will Blow your Mind

Amazing Facts About Chimpanzees

On July 2, 2018, Easy Travel owner Sayyedah Hirji Gulamhussein watched in awe as world-famous primatologist-anthropologist Dr Jane Goodall stepped on stage in Arusha, Tanzania, to deliver a riveting speech about her life’s work and love: chimpanzees.

Sayyedah left feeling deeply inspired. It’s generally agreed that Jane Goodall is the world’s leading expert on chimpanzees. She has been an instrumental figure in wildlife conservation worldwide, most notably in East Africa. Goodall has dedicated her entire life to studying, understanding, and caring for the welfare of our closest nonhuman relatives, and the bulk of her chimpanzee studies occurred in, yes, Tanzania.

A Chimpanzee Spotted Laying Down Under The Bushes

July 14, 2018 is the First-Ever World Chimpanzee Day. To honor Jane Goodall and these incredible animals, we are dedicating a post entirely to the chimpanzee, our closest cousin on the tree of life. To this day, Tanzania remains one of the best places on Earth to spend time with these chimps. So here it is, all the need-to-know info about chimpanzees, just for you.

Sayyedah - Easy Travel Owner Meeting Dr Jane Goodall

How Jane Goodall Fell in Love with Chimps (and Tanzania)

Before we dive into chimp life, here’s your two minute history on Jane Goodall: Goodall was born in London, England in 1934. In her early twenties, she visited a family friend’s farm in Kenya’s highlands, and this began a lifelong love affair with East Africa. Goodall would later connect with famous archaeologist Louis Leakey, who hired her as secretary and sent her to the Olduvai Gorge (site to the earliest known evidence of our human ancestors; a recommended stop on Easy Travel tours!) and, later, to Gombe National Park, in 1960. Back in England, after receiving her PhD in ethology Goodall would return to Tanzania and spend years studying chimpanzee behavior, thus setting into motion one of the longest scientific research projects in the world.

Certificate From Jane Goodall For Visiting

She would later go on to establish the Jane Goodall Institute in 1977. Today, Goodall travels over 300 days a year as the world’s foremost advocate for wildlife conservation. Watch this breathtaking video of Jane Goodall assisting in a chimpanzee reintroduction program:

Introducing the Chimpanzee:

    • Species Name: Pan troglodytes. The genus Pan includes both the chimpanzee and bonobo. Both are endangered.
    • Average Lifespan: 45 years in the wild. The oldest known chimpanzee was 79 years old. (source)
    • Size: 5 – 5.5 feet (1.5 meters) 70-130lbs (32-60kg)
    • Range: Native to sub-Saharan Africa, some found in Northern Africa.
  • Estimated Population: 170,000 – 300,000 in the wild.

Family Of Chimpanzees Spotted In The Wild

Five Things to Know about Chimpanzees

1. They are our Closest Nonhuman Cousin

Google something like: “what animal is our closest relative?” You know what comes up? Chimpanzees. Well, the Great Apes come up—chimps, bonobos, orangutans, and gorillas. 98% of our genes are shared with chimpanzees. Humans are to chimpanzees as horses are to zebras—we’re that similar! Mind officially blown.

2. Chimps Aren’t Monkeys 

Despite common misconception, the Great Apes are not monkeys, but, rather, of the family Hominidae, of which humans are part. Want to know a wildlife hack  to know the difference between monkeys and apes? Check out their butts. Monkeys have tails. Great Apes don’t.

3. Chimpanzees Understand Death 

Recent findings suggest that chimpanzees (like elephants) will mourn the death of kin. This is added to self-awareness, tool use, and warring factions as notable behaviors shared with humans: Here

Mind Blowing Facts About Chimpanzees

4.  Their Beds are Way Cleaner Than Ours

Not only do chimpanzees make their beds each night, but they also choose new locations and fresh materials, too. That’s right. Chimps will sleep in trees, and their nests are always far cleaner than the average human bed. (Source)

5.  Tanzania: Ground Zero for Chimpanzee Sightings

If there’s one place to visit chimpanzees in their natural habitat, it’s Tanzania. In Gombe National Park (Western Tanzania), there exists the most famous chimpanzee reserve in the world, again a result of Jane Goodall’s lifelong study and wildlife reserve.

Bottom Line?

Tanzania teems with an abundance of life that must continue to be respected and protected, like the chimpanzee. Jane Goodall’s work is far from over. Easy Travel is a committed outfitter to responsible tourism, and we strive to give back more than we receive. Take this approach and everyone wins.


Getting You There?

Interested in exploring chimpanzee habitat while in Tanzania? Our team can organize a tailor-made trip to Gombe National Park, and customize your trip to complement any other add-ons. From the more traveled Northern safari circuit to the most adventurous, off the beaten path destinations, like Western and Southern Tanzania, Easy Travel can meet you at any level of adventure.

Additional Resources:

National Geographic – Facts About The Chimpanzee

Things we have learnt about Chimpanzees

Jane Goodall – 10 Things About Chimpanzees